How John Kitchen Qualified for Boston

Name: John Kitchen

Sex: Male

Age (at the time of first BQ): 48

Height (at the time of first BQ):  6’1″

Weight (at the time of first BQ): 175

At which marathon did you get your first BQ? RnR DC

Tell us a little about the race. Sprained ankle 2 weeks before race. Had one week of peak mileage of 42 miles. Unsure of capable pace, I used HR as metric. Went out to fast and crashed and burned last 6 miles. Took me approx 60 minutes to walk/ jog last 10k

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ? 3 years

Did you run in college or high school? Yes

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ? Uknown

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ? Unkown

Approximately how many races did you run in that year? 2

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was? no

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach? Yes

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how? Yes, could run less and simulate feelings of running on tired legs. Helped build cumulative fatigue without the pounding

Did speed work play a role in your training? If so, how? Tempo work yes
Speed work not so much

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ? You have to put in the time and effort either with straight running or cross training

Boston Qualifier Questionnaire Art

Karen’s Story of Qualifying for Boston Marathon

Name: Karen

Sex: Female

Age (at the time of first BQ): 32

Height (at the time of first BQ):  5’10”

Weight (at the time of first BQ): 133

At which marathon did you get your first BQ? DesMoines

Tell us a little about the race.

Nice course around town. Some rolling hills, but nothing crazy. Well-organized

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ? ~15 years

Did you run in college or high school? Yes

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ? No idea

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ?       1100

Approximately how many races did you run in that year? 3

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was? no

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach? No

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how? No

Did speed work play a role in your training? If so, how? I did some random track workouts with friends. Mostly intervals of 400-1000m once/week

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?Boston Qualifier Questionnaire Art

Davis’s Are Prisons Obsolete

Are Prisons Obsolete?
Angela Davis

 

This book came out more than ten years ago, when the modern-day prison abolitionist movement was surging on the left, powered by groups like Critical Resistance and intellectuals like Davis. I was part of that world and I’m a little embarrassed it took me this long to read this.

This is make, no mistake, a polemic. But it is also well done arguing the case that we need not just prison reform, but prison abolition. That the institution cannot be reformed, but instead must be abandoned. It’s a radical, idea, of course. But one worth taking seriously.

There’s nothing that says we must imprison those who break societies laws. Other forms of restorative justice and mediation should also be considered. Davis makes the cases for these alternatives to incarceration eloquently and succinctly in this slim volume and while I don’t also agree with her, I always find her compelling. Too often today we tune out the voices that don’t align exactly with our own opinions. That’s a mistake. Take the concept Davis is arguing (that prisons are barbaric and should be replaced) seriously. Listen to her arguments, look at her sources, and decide what is valid and what isn’t. You’ll be a better citizen for it.

Worth a read for those interested in criminal justice and a just society, which, really should be all of us.

Recommended.

Ward’s Men We Reaped

Men We Reaped: A Memoir 
Jesmyn Ward

There may be other American writers working today who are as gifted as Ward, but I have a hard time believing there are any more gifted. From fiction to memoir, Ward consistently leaves me at the edge of tears at the raw emotion of what she is sharing, and the technical brilliance with which she does it.
This is a memoir. It is the story memorializing the dead men from her hometown in rural Louisiana. All the men here were young, all died unnatural deaths, and all were black. None of that should surprise you, young black men in our country die at shameful rates. How this comes about is what Ward is struggling to explore.

The story focuses on the untimely death of Ward’s brother, but it comes to his death last, as a sort of culmination of a series of events, all related in one way of another, that hit Ward’s community over the span of a few short years. The book is pitch perfect in balancing reportage with anguish, making us feel the loses Ward suffered, personally, with every death, while also not losing sight of the larger story here – that our society sends young black men to the grave with alarming regularity.

All of Ward’s books are worth reading. She is truly among the best living American authors, but this one feels the most necessary, the most urgent, of what she has done so far. If you’re going to start anywhere with Ward’s work, I suggest you start here. But keep going, she has much to share.

Recommended.

Marc G’s story of Qualifying for Boston

Name: Marc G

Sex: Male

Age (at the time of first BQ): 26

Height (at the time of first BQ):  5’9

Weight (at the time of first BQ): 165 lbs

At which marathon did you get your first BQ? Carlsbad

Tell us a little about the race. First ever marathon, first year of running. Told a girl I would break 3 hours and she was waiting at the finish for me. Went out in 1:22 or so feeling like a rock star, finished in 2:59 seeing purple elephants flash before my eyes. But I did it. Didn’t run another one for well over 10 years. Bet if I would have run 3:00 instead I would have run another the same year.

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ? 1 year

Did you run in college or high school? No

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ? 3000 (including childhood play I guess)

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ? 1000

Approximately how many races did you run in that year? 3

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was? no

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach? Yes

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how? Maybe I went to the gym, surfed, and swam a bit

Did speed work play a role in your training? If so, how? Our club did speed work one day a week

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?

Boston Qualifier Scott’s Story

Name: Scott

Sex: Male

Age (at the time of first BQ): 27

Height (at the time of first BQ):  5′ 10”

Weight (at the time of first BQ): 140

At which marathon did you get your first BQ? Erie

Tell us a little about the race.

Ran 2:58 relatively even split. Flat course. A little warm and sunny (mid-60 F)

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ? 10 years

Did you run in college or high school? Yes

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ? 5000

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ? 1000

Approximately how many races did you run in that year? 2

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was? No

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach? No

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how?

Did very little to no cross training.

Did speed work play a role in your training? If so, how? Did little speedwork. Shortest were some 400 repeats.

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?

Boston Qualifier Questionnaire Art

Boston Qualifier Questionnaire: Charlie

Name Charlie

Sex: Male

Age (at the time of first BQ): 45

Height (at the time of first BQ):  5-7

Weight (at the time of first BQ): 140

At which marathon did you get your first BQ? Tell us a little about the race. OBX Marathon

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ? 30 years

Did you run in college or high school? Yes

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ? 20,000+

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ? 1100

Approximately how many races did you run in that year? 12

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was? Focused on increasing long run every couple of weeks until I could go 26 miles

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach? No

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how? No

Did speed work play a role in your training? If so, how? No

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ? After having run Boston 3 times now, I would say weekly/monthly mileage is the single most important factor. Being able to run 50+ miles weeks consistently is most effective training, then sprinkle in all the other extras.