More on Why We Run

When I picked up Bernd Heinrich’s Why We Run, I wasn’t sure I was going to enjoy it. It is both a memoir of ultra training and a mediation on what we can learn from the endurance and running abilities of various animals. Generally, I’m not a huge fan of naturalist writing – I’m a city boy, and the life of bugs isn’t really my thing. However, Heinrich’s strong writing, and idiosyncratic approach, really sucked me in. I couldn’t put the book down. I’ll probably write a fuller review in the future, but here’s another quote that has stuck with me.

A quick pounce-and-kill requires no dream. Dreams are the beacons that carry us far ahead into the hunt, into the future, and into a marathon. We can visualize far ahead. We see our quarry even as it recedes over the hills and into the mists. It is still in our minds eye, still a target, and imagination becomes the main motivator. It is the pull that allows us to reach into the future, whether it is to kill a mammoth or an antelope, or to write a book, or to achieve record time in a race. Other things being equal, those hunters who had the most love of nature would be the ones who sought out all its allures. They were the ones who persisted the longest on the trail. They derived pleasure from being out, exploring, and traveling afar. When they felt fatigue and pain, they did not stop because their dream carried them still forward.

They were our ancestors.

Pictograph of Runners cited by Heinrich in Why We Run

Pictograph of Runners cited by Heinrich in Why We Run

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About seanv2

Scholar, gentleman, jock. I run the website Milo and the Calf. There you will find the Boston Qualifier Questionnaire where runners share their stories of qualifying for the Boston Marathon. You'll also find my thoughts on endurance sports, ancient history, Judaism, and hundreds of book reviews.
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