Review: Norton’s Leo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire

Ed note: Like the many, many other reviews I’ve been posting here lately, this one was written for a now defunct live journal account.

Leo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire
Anne Norton

Though the neocon movement seems more and more like a thing of history, this is a nice quick and easy read that is wonderfully catty about Straussian’s in the academy and includes an excellent line about how Norton doesn’t want to hear about the glories of war from slope shouldered men with soft hands sitting in the academic lounge at the University of Chicago.

BAM.

Norton has far more time for Strauss himself than she does for his followers. She does an excellent job of pointing out the absurdity of many of the Straussian’s work, citing for one example, Allan Bloom, the author of The Closing of the American Mind.

In Closing of the American Mind, Bloom argues with the growing inclusion of those less gifted (or rich, or, by extension, not white) into the colleges of the nation, America was losing its intellectual rigor. Basically, its been down hill since the G.I. Bill and a liberal education is not what it once was. As Norton points out, in making this argument, Bloom counted on those liberal in power to behave like, well, liberals, and not mention that as a Jew and a gay man, he really had no place in the academy that he was championing. There is a genius here in knowing your enemy will not make use of your personal life to point out the contradictions in your thinking, but there is also an obvious self-hatred that is both sad and disturbing.

Norton’s bit on the more overtly political Straussian’s (i.e. Wolfowitz) isn’t nearly as interesting. The book to read for that side of the story is the Rise of the Vulcans by Jim Mann.

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About seanv2

Scholar, gentleman, jock. I run the website Milo and the Calf. There you will find the Boston Qualifier Questionnaire where runners share their stories of qualifying for the Boston Marathon. You'll also find my thoughts on endurance sports, ancient history, Judaism, and hundreds of book reviews.
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