Your Occasional Stoic — You May Die Today

It is possible you may die today. Regulate every act and thought accordingly. But to die, if there are gods, is not a thing to be afraid of, for the gods will not involve you in evil. But if indeed the gods do not exist, or if they have no concern about human affairs, what is it to me to live in a universe devoid of gods or devoid of Providence? But they do exist, and they do care for human things, and they have put all the means in man’s power to enable him resist real evils. If after death there was anything evil, they would have provided man with the power to resist it. If it does not harm your character, how can it harm your life? Nature would not have overlooked such dangers through failing to recognize them nor is it possible that it has made so great a mistake, either through want of power or want of skill, that good and evil should happen indiscriminately to the good and the bad. But death certainly, and life, honor and dishonor, pain and pleasure, all these things equally happen to good men and bad,  as these are things which make us neither better nor worse. Therefore, they are neither good nor evil.

  • Meditations, 2:11

marcus-aurelius

We all die. We all feel pleasure, and pain. These feelings are universal and therefore devoid of moral weight. It is what we do with them that creates our character. It is how we accept the inevitability of death, the temporary nature of pleasure (and pain) which gives us our philosophical bearings.

Do not try to avoid the ups and downs of life, try to navigate them, not let them set you adrift.

This is part of an ongoing project of idiosyncratic translations and annotations to Marcus Aurelius’s Meditations. You can see the whole series at Your Occasional Stoic. 

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About seanv2

Scholar, gentleman, jock. I run the website Milo and the Calf. There you will find the Boston Qualifier Questionnaire where runners share their stories of qualifying for the Boston Marathon. You'll also find my thoughts on endurance sports, ancient history, Judaism, and hundreds of book reviews.
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