The BQ(Q) – Eric L

Here’s a great BQ(Q) with Eric, who is officially the tallest respondent to the survey at 6’6”. Thanks for taking the time to do this, Eric!

Name

Eric L.

Sex:

Male

Age (at the time of first BQ):

45

Height:

6’6″

Weight (at the time of first BQ):

170

At which marathon did you get your first BQ?

R&R Montreal

 

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ?

3 years

Did you run in college or high school?

No

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ?

5500

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ?

2500

Approximately how many races did you run in that year?

2

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was?

Yes, Hansons Advanced

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how?

No cross training. Regular hip exercises, a light version of the Myrtl routine (easy to google)

 Did speed work play a role or specific workouts play a role in your training? If so, how?

Hard to say as the Hansons plan focuses more on running at marathon pace.
Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?

I qualified at my first marathon. I think my secret is simply that I have no excuses for not running. I ran in -40 temps, on family vacation, on Christmas day and eve, with a cold… Whatever life throws at me, I go out there and run.

Like the boston stories? A complete archive is here. My post analyzing the data is here. 

The BQ(Q) – Dave

Name

Dave

Sex:

Male

Age (at the time of first BQ):

48

Height:

70

Weight (at the time of first BQ):

135

At which marathon did you get your first BQ?

Twin Cities

 

Tell us a little about the race.

My first marathon in 26 years. I ran without a watch and went much faster (about 20 minutes) than I expected

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ?

I resumed running 2 years earlier

Did you run in college or high school?

Yes

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ?

?

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ?

1200

Approximately how many races did you run in that year?

20

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was?

no

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach?

No

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how?

No

Did speed work play a role or specific workouts play a role in your training? If so, how?

No

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?

 

The BQ(Q) – Anthony D

Anthony used the same idea I’m using now – heart rate based base training with interval work and tempo work. Of course, he had success much sooner, after only running for a year and a half! Thanks for sharing your story, Anthony!

Name

Anthony D

Sex:

Male

Age (at the time of first BQ):

46

Height:

5’5”

Weight (at the time of first BQ):

142

At which marathon did you get your first BQ?

Chicago

Tell us a little about the race.

Flat course, well supported. 59 degrees, 68% humidity at start of race. My first marathon.

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ?

1.5 years

Did you run in college or high school?

No

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ?

2579

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ?

2385

Approximately how many races did you run in that year?

1

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was?

Yes, customized Jack Daniel’s RunSMART.com

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach?

Yes

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how?

Yes – increased flexibility, range of motion and core, adductor, illiopsoas strength.

Did speed work play a role or specific workouts play a role in your training? If so, how?

Yes. 2 quality workouts per week that rotated through long, marathon, threshold, vo2max and anaerobic paces according to the training percentages and principles in the Daniel’s Running Formula. I self-selected 60 miles per week as my peak based upon my average weekly volume over the previous 4-6 months of aerobic base building before starting to train for Chicago.

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?

Build your aerobic base first via many long, slow, easy miles. Follow the Maffetone max HR training approach and you will get faster while staying aerobic – critical for marathoning without bonking. Your BQ training plan should include lots of 1 or 2 mile threshold paced intervals with short recovery times (1 minute) along with several long marathon paced runs. Good luck, stay healthy and enjoy the stride!

The BQ(Q) – Tara C

When I started running, I got involved in the forum at runningahead where I learned pretty much everything I know about running. Tara has been a regular over there for years and I really appreciate her taking the time to fill this out, thanks Tara!

Name: Tara C

Sex: F

Age (at the time of first BQ): 25, then not again until I was  45   – (the following answers are for the 25 year old me, not the 45 year old me)

Height: 5’6”

Weight (at the time of first BQ): ??

At which marathon did you get your first BQ? What was your finishing time? Tell us a little about the race.

New York City Marathon – It was an unseasonably hot day (70s) – but since I MUCH prefer the heat to the cold I was happy about it – and I was certainly in the minority.  It was my first ever marathon – and I had hoped to possibly BQ – but didn’t know what to expect.  This was well before Garmin – so watching your Timex and keeping track of splits on the run was difficult.  Mostly I tried to maintain a steady effort  – and did.  I got a cramp at mile 25 but that was it.  I ran a 3:23.

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ? Did you run in college or high school?

I ran XC in high school and college – but only as a way to gain fitness for XC ski racing.  I started running when I was 13 years old – so had been running about 10 years prior to my BQ.

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ?

10 years of teenage/twenty-something running – I have no idea about mileage?  Maybe 500 a year – so 5000 miles total?

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ?

At 24 I was running about 5-6 miles a day, so approx 1500.

Approximately how many races did you run in that year?

Zero.  No other races that year.

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was?

I followed a program I found in Runner’s World magazine.  It was based on running time – not mileage.

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach?

No.  I ran solo.  Every. Damn. Day.

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how?

No.

Did speed work play a role or specific workouts play a role in your training? If so, how?

No speed work.  Although being young and foolish I am certain I ran too hard most days.

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?

Being 20+ years older than my first BQ I have learned that every runner is unique – what works for someone doesn’t necessarily work for you.  So don’t be afraid to experiment and be confident that you’ll find the right training for you.

So much of running and training for marathons is mental.   The ability to get up and grind it out day after day.  During peak weeks ask yourself “How badly do I want it?”  and know that each mile that you endure in training (especially on tired legs and toasted motivation) are money in the bank for race day.

Lastly – Believe.  Believe you can do it.  Picture yourself running the race and kicking ass.  Imagine the time on the clock that you want to see as your cross the line.  Start prepping your mind well ahead of race day. Trust in your training and believe in yourself.

The BQ(Q) – Mike Wardian (Hoka One One)

Really excited to share this informative BQ(Q) composed by Hoka One One athlete, Michael Wardian. Mike is one of the most successful distance runners in America, competing at a high level at every distance from the 5k to 100 miles. Mike has set world records for the fastest marathon and 50K on an indoor 200-meter track. In March 2015, he set the World Record for the fastest 50K on a treadmill, and then broke it in May of 2015. He’s also an incredibly nice guy.

I had the chance to speak with Mike briefly at the Vermont City Marathon this year. He was funny, approachable, and my son loved his beard. Thanks again, Mike, for taking the time to fill this out and tell us about your first BQ. I’m really looking forward to seeing what you get up to in the year to come!

Name: Michael Wardian

Twitter: @mikewardian  Instagram: mikewardian

website: www.mikewardian.com, Facebook: michael wardian

Sex:  Male

Age (at the time of first BQ): 22 years old

Height:  6 feet 0 inches (183 cm)

Weight (at the time of first BQ):  148lbs (currently 139lbs-142lbs)

At which marathon did you get your first BQ? Marine Corps Marathon-1996

What was your finishing time?  I ran 3:06:54:

Tell us a little about the race.

I ran the 21st Marine Corps Marathon in order to get a qualifier for the Boston Marathon and I had to run under 3:10 and made my goal.  I ran in lacrosse shorts, cotton socks, a cotton t-shirt, no band-aids, I felt great but nervous till about 18 miles then I was feeling really confident and then with 4 miles to go I thought I am totally making it but with 2 miles to go I had like 15 mins and I thought, this is AWESOME but with 800 meters, it was getting close…but I made it.

Still one of the happiest moments in my running career.

How long had you been running when you ran your first BQ? Did you run in college or high school?

I had been running for about 1 year when I got my BQ.  I did not run in high school or college.

What was your approximate lifetime mileage at the time of your first BQ?

I would think my approximate mileage was about 2,340 miles or about 45 miles per week.

How many miles did you run in the year before your first BQ?

I ran about 2,340 miles.

Approximately how many races did you run in that year?

I ran one (1) other race, the  MS 1/2 marathon and I ran 1:14 mins for 3rd place, I had no idea what I was doing but ran as hard as I could for a long as possible.

Did you follow a canned program? If so, which one? If not, can you give us an idea of what your training philosophy was?
I did follow a canned program that was given to me by Vicky Voisin, my buddy Vince Voisin’s mother. She had just run the Boston Marathon and was nice enough to make a copy of a training program for me.  I don’t even know who wrote it.  I just wanted to run a little as possible to achieve my goal at first and then after reading Lydiard, I started to run more and longer.

Did you run with a running club or utilize a coach?
I did start running with the Pacers Running Club, here in Washington,DC and I don’t run with Pacers anymore as my time is super compressed but I would if I had more time, I love those guys and the friends I made.  I still run with some of the guys 20 years later.  I don’t have a coach, I actually coach people and can be contacted for coaching at mwardian@rocketmail.com

Did cross training play a role in your training? If so, how?
I do cross train with cycling and weights.  I am bike commuter so I ride my bike at least 10 times a week and a lot more as I run errands and try to go by bike whenever I can.

Did speed work play a role or specific workouts play a role in your training? If so, how?

I do enjoy speedwork and when I am trying to get faster I go to the track at least 1 time a week, I have been racing a lot so have been going to the track less but if you want to get faster for me the track is where to do it.

Any other thoughts you would like to share with those of working towards a BQ?

I think that everyone is capable of getting a BQ and I hope that your readers have the opportunity to run the BAA Boston Marathon, it is such an incredible event and really is a standard bearer for what a first class event can be and the impact it can have not just on the community but on your life.  I know that my goal of qualifying for the Boston Marathon changed the course of my life and I feel so fortunate for everything that Boston has given me and I know it can for you too.

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